Product history

The CLAAS success story.

What started in 1913 with the production of straw binders has today become a staple of the agricultural technology sector, propelling the CLAAS name to global renown. Take a look at the products that have made CLAAS what is is today.

Product history

The CLAAS success story.

What started in 1913 with the production of straw binders has today become a staple of the agricultural technology sector, propelling the CLAAS name to global renown. Take a look at the products that have made CLAAS what is is today.

Forage harvesters

1973 – 1976

CLAAS JAGUAR 60 SF

The rapid rise in the popularity of maize cultivation towards the end of the 1960s called for ever more powerful harvesting systems. The existing chopping technology of the day, used primarily as attached or trailed implements, was soon at the limits of its performance. CLAAS recognised the segment's potential early on, and in June 1973 initiated production of a high-performance, self-propelled forage harvester, the JAGUAR 60 SF. The JAGUAR 60 SF combined assemblies of the trailed JAGUAR 60 with tried-and-tested combine harvester assemblies, allowing it to be launched after a very brief development period. The harvesting performance of the JAGUAR 60 SF was considerably higher than the trailed chopper, thanks to its 120-hp engine. The self-propelled machine was also much faster and more manoeuvrable during chopping in maize fields, and made lane chopping possible. The dual-row maize header and pick-up attachment was also adopted without modification from the trailed JAGUAR. By 1976, more than 500 units of the JAGUAR 60 SF had been produced.

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1975 – 1983

JAGUAR 80 SF

The new large self-propelled JAGUAR 80 SF was equipped with a much wider chopping drum than the JAGUAR 60 SF. The ability to separate the intake and drum housings was an entirely new feature, facilitating excellent access to the chopping drum and intake rollers for servicing. A new blower unit facilitated rapid conveyance of the chopped material to the transport wagon. The new CLAAS steering system was first introduced on the JAGUAR 80 SF. Sensor brackets attached to the maize header scanned the maize rows and relayed the impulses to the steering wheels to automatically steer the machine. This innovative new feature greatly eased the driver's workload under difficult harvesting conditions and increased the machine's overall ground coverage. Competitors likewise equipped their choppers with the CLAAS steering system. The JAGUAR 80 SF was originally equipped with a 157-kW (213-hp) engine. A three- or four-row maize header, a four-row maize picker, a 3.3-metre mower unit and a pick-up unit could also be attached.

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1976 – 1982

JAGUAR 70 SF

With the JAGUAR 80 SF, CLAAS engineered an extremely powerful, self-propelled forage harvester. Long before production began, it was clear that the JAGUAR 60 SF would not be able to survive alongside its "big brother" on the market. Development therefore soon began on the JAGUAR 70 SF. The "new mini" was intended to process double-row or tri-row silage maize, and the chopping drum width was therefore increased. Engine sizes of 110-kW (150-hp) and 129-kW (175-hp) were available. The ability to separate the intake and drum housings was adopted from the JAGUAR 80 SF. To ensure generous ground clearance in the transport position, the harvesting headers, together with the chopper assembly, could be pivoted around the chopping drum axis.

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1983 – 1987

JAGUAR 675, 680, 685, 690, 695 MEGA, 682

With the 600-series JAGUAR 675, 680, 685, 690, 695 MEGA and 682, CLAAS raised the bar in chopper technology from 1983 on. The machines' modern design and rear-sloping roof were also well received on the market. The base-level machine proved a hit, thanks to its striking new features. A metal detector was seamlessly integrated into the lower compaction roller. Above the chopping drum, the grains of maize were crushed by the CORN CRACKER, consisting of two rollers. The post-accelerator in the ejection chute provided additional momentum to move the crop along to the transport wagon. The spacious cab mounted on silent blocks adopted from the combine harvester provided the driver with an ergonomically engineered working environment. Additionally, the harvesting headers, chopper assembly and chute flap could be actuated via a control lever. The ability to separate the intake and drum housings and to pivot these around the chopping drum axis were also adopted, and remained a ground-breaking development for the years to come. A six-row maize header was then launched for the first time. The maximum permissible transport width of three metres was achieved by folding up the exterior side parts. Competitors, too, bought this harvesting header from CLAAS Saulgau in large volumes. The nearly 7,000 machines built made CLAAS the market leader with a market share in Europe of more than 50 percent.

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1987 – 1998

JAGUAR 695 SL, 690 SL, 685 SL, 682 SL, 682 S

The most striking characteristic of the new SL range was the cab. The operator's workstation was designed for even greater ease of use. The engine range included 260-kW (354-hp) and 158-kW (215-hp) models. The two entirely new JAGUAR 682 SL and 682 S machines featured 158-kW (215-hp) engines. The new V-chopping drum with staggered, bisected knives homogenised the chopped crop flow and reduced the clamping force in the post-accelerator. To increase the crop throughput, the drum speed and number of V-drum knives was increased. Harvesting headers for whole plant silage and ground ear maize were also available.

1993 – 2001

JAGUAR 880, 860, 840, 820

The 800 series featured engines delivering 354 kW (481 hp) to 228 kW (310 hp). Installed behind the steering axle crosswise to the direction of travel, the simple and direct drive systems facilitated an optimal cool air supply and ease of access to the machine interior. The CORN CRACKER, for example,could be rolled backwards easily prior to harvesting grass silage and exchanged for a grass shaft. This innovative configuration has given direction to modern forage harvester production around the world, right up to the present day. Thanks to the favourable drive axle load, eight-row maize headers could now be attached. The exceptional design of the new CLAAS choppers inspired confidence from the outset. The spacious cab with curved front window and sloping roof was the first to offer two seats for the machine operator and occasional passenger. A central lubrication system was also offered. Additionally, the post-accelerator positioned behind the CORN CRACKER enhanced the chopped crop flow.

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1999 – present

JAGUAR 900, 890, 870, 850, 830

With 445 kW (605 hp) beneath the JAGUAR 900 bonnet, a considerable performance threshold was crossed from 1999. Even the smallest machine in the range delivered favourable performance at 236 kW (321 hp). The tried-and-tested base body and design were lagely adopted from the predecessor range. New features included mudguards above the steering wheels and a modern tailgate design. An entirely redesigned workstation was provided for the driver. All functions could be easily configured or monitored via a terminal. The grinding process of the chopping drum, for example, could be regulated from the comfort of the driver's seat or the counterblade engaged. To ensure the JAGUAR arrived simultaneously with tractor-trailer combinations, the high-speed version SPEEDSTAR (with permissible top speed of 40 km/h) was now available from CLAAS. Alongside the standard harvesting headers, row-independent maize headers RU 450 and RU 600 were now available. The DIRECT DISC 520 cutterbar was now included in the range for mowing and chopping whole plant silage in a single work step.

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2007 – present

JAGUAR 980, 970, 960, 950, 940, 930

Launched in 2007, JAGUAR series machines 980-930 proved a hit from the outset, thanks to their outstanding performance and top chop quality. CLAAS was thus able to once again demonstrate its consistent approach to practice-oriented machine building in the forage harvesting sector. The new models are equipped with a wider machine spectrum, a new intelligent engine control system, a continuous moisture measurement system, upgraded CEBIS comfort and a new V-MAX knife drum.

The AUTO-FILL automatic filling system of the JAGUAR 980-930 was awarded a gold medal at the Agritechnica 2009 event. The system facilitates easier automatic control of wagon filling, greatly easing the workload.

The CLAAS JAGUAR received a further prestigious award at the AGRITECHNICA 2011 event: "Machine of the Year". Among other features, the machine's impressive new V8 and V12 MAN engines and new demand-based DYNAMIC POWER power controls won over the event's judges.

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